Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference and Expo on Audiology and Deaf Studies Las Vegas,Nevada, USA.

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Day 2 :

  • Auditory Rehabilitation
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Hua Ou received her medical degree at West China Center of Medical Sciences at Sichuan University, Sichuan, China and practiced as an otolaryngologist before she came to America ten years ago. She then received her Ph.D. in Hearing Science as well as a Master’s Degree in Biostatistics at the University of Iowa. She is an assistant professor and a biostatistician at Illinois State University. She has received multiple awards including ASHA career award and has published ten papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

The Acceptable Noise Level (ANL) has received substantial attention due to its potential to predict hearing-aid use success. It is a subjective measure of patients’ willingness to tolerate noise, while listening to speech at the most comfortable level. Previous research suggests no relationship between ANLs and objective speech recognition performance in noise for hearing-impaired listeners. However, the relationship between self-rated speech intelligibility and ANL is unknown.

 

Forty-six hearing-impaired listeners and twenty normal-hearing listeners participated in the study. The ANLs were measured by Quick Speech-in-Noise (QuickSIN) test sentences in a four-talker babble. The self-rated speech intelligibility and the objective speech recognition performance were both measured, using the same test format and materials from the QuickSIN protocol. The differences between the rating of intelligibility and objective measures reflect how accurately listeners can judge their ability to listen in noise. Pearson correlation was used for the data analysis. The data revealed a significantly moderate correlation (r = 0.6, p < .0001) between ANLs and self-rated speech intelligibility for hearing-impaired listeners and a weak but significant correlation of 0.4 for the normal-hearing listeners (p = .04). No relationship was found between ANLs and the discrepancy of objective and subjective speech recognition performance for either group. The results indicated that listeners who rated themselves as highly able to listen to speech in noise were better able to tolerate noise than those who rated themselves as less able to listen in noise.

  • Auditory Neurophysiology

Session Introduction

Zaid Jawad. Abu Rajab Altamimi

MUTAH University Medical College,Jordan

Title: Innovation in Otology: Stability of Ossicular Reconstruction
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Abu Rajab Altamimi graduated from MUTAH University Medical College, Jordan in 2010 with  honors.He had  the chance of research and oberverships experiense at University of Toledo,Ohio for 10 months after finshing his internship. Currently, he is pursuing  post graduate residency  training accredited by ACGMEi (Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education international) in Otorhinolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery at Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar where he has also developed a keen interest in both basic and clinical research. He has several presentations in international conferences.

Abstract:

Objectives:  To describe a modified technique of titanium prosthesis stabilization in ossicular chain reconstruction during mastoidectomy, and to evaluate the outcome of this technique.

Methods: A retrospective study done at a tertiary referral institute Included 133 cases of all ossiculoplasties performed between August 2013 and August 2015. We are suggesting a new technique for ossiculoplasties mechanical stability using Vario Kurz titanium prostheses by: partial ossicular replacement prosthesis (PORP) is crimped on the head of stapes and total ossicular replacement prosthesis (TORP) is coupled to the footplate by cartilage shoe. Both prostheses were coupled to the drum by embedding a pin on the headpl ate of prosthesis in a full thickness broad cartilage palisades graft. After packing of the ear canal, the stability of reconstruction was checked using 30 degree scope placed in the mastoid. Preoperative and postoperative audiometric evaluation using air-bone gap were assessed. Results are compared with historical control groups. 

Results: The study included 133 patients, of which 88 underwent PORP reconstruction and 45 underwent TORP reconstruction. Mean follow-up was 14 months. A postoperative air-bone gap (ABG)≤20 dB was obtained in 83 % of the patients ( 89% for PORP, and 71% for TORP). 

Conclusions: A robust prosthesis stability leads to a better ossicular coupling and more satisfactory hearing outcome compared to conventional techniques

Speaker
Biography:

I was born in Guantanamo, Cuba. I studied medicine in Santiago de Cuba. After, perform the studies in the specialty of Clinical Neurophysiology in Havana. I am working in the Neurosciences Center of Cuba. I have experience the studies of EEG, EMG and evoked potentials in humans and animal models. Since 2005, I am member of the National Group of Cochlear Implant, where I investigate about Brain Plasticity in deaf and deafblind children with neurophysiological techniques and fMRI. Also, I am working in Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring and attend the patients in intensive care unit

Abstract:

The cochlear implants are given the opportunity to gain the sense of hearing to deaf subject. Little is known the role of plasticity as a means to reactivate brain function.

Objective: To evaluate on plasticity before and after Cochlear Implants (CI).

Methods: evaluation of the maps topography of Visual (VEP), Somatosensory by stimulation of median (SEP-N20) and tibial (SEP-P40) nerves. We evaluated the Cortical Auditory (CAEP) and Electroencephalography (EEG) in deaf (n=18) and deafblind (n=12) pre-lingual.

Results: Topographic distribution maps of the SSEP-N20 showed expansion of activation, the over-representation was less extensive in deaf (area temporal) that in deafblind children (areas temporal and occipital). SEP-P40 no showed changed -strictly localized in area of -somesthetic information representation of the foot. The VEP no showed significant changes in deaf. Also offered for the first time, evidence of Cross-Modal-Plasticity through a study Post-IC, where deaf and deafblind children who are implanted after 7 years of age if there are changes in the SEP-N20 and the functional connectivity measured with EEG. While that with the CAEP was possible to evidence the cortical activation by the auditory sensory input through the CI.

Conclusions: The high functional connectivity after implantation and the changes in the SEP-N20 to the left temporal region in deaf and deafblind children with 7 o more age was interpreted as evidence of Cross-Modal-Plasticity, effect that may to have the use of the hands for communication in these children, with consequent implications to the optimal use of the CI during rehabilitation auditory.

Biography:

Dr. Sanchez earned a PhD in auditory neuroscience from Kent State, a master’s degree in audiology from Michigan State and a bachelor’s degree in  communication sciences and disorders from Northern Colorado. He’s clinically trained in audiology from the Cleveland Clinic and completed postdoctoral training in developmental auditory neurobiology at the University of Washington. As director of the Central Auditory Physiology Laboratory at Northwestern, his research investigates developmental mechanisms underlying ion channel and synaptic receptor function. Such biophysical properties may guide requirements for cochlear implant and hearing aid design and potentially provide pharmacological targets to improve disorders of the auditory system.

Abstract:

Ultrafast and temporally precise action potentials are biophysical specializations of auditory brainstem neurons; properties necessary for encoding sound localization and communication cues. Fundamental to this are voltage dependent potassium and sodium ion channels. In this presentation, I will report our recent findings on how these ion channels shape action potential properties in the developing auditory brainstem. Using patch-­‐clamp recordings from individual cochlear nucleus neurons, our results indicate that the refinement of active ion channel properties operate differentially in order to develop action potential specializations. Such differential regulation promotes the firing of fast, reliable and phased-­‐locked action potentials at relatively high rates of afferent stimulation, a biophysical property required for normal auditory information processing. Developmental changes in ion channel subunit content were the largest contributor to this process and blockade of specific ion channel function resulted in aberrant neuronal excitability and action potential control. The idea that the regulation of ion channel properties is a critical mechanism underlying auditory pathophysiological conditions will also be discussed.

  • Hearing Aids and Treatment Technology
Biography:

Tracy Wentzel has completed her masters at the age of 30 years from University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa.  She currently works at Helen Joseph Hospital within the public health care setting in South Africa. She is passionate about hearing aids and ensuring a patient centred approach to hearing aid fittings in order to ensure positive outcomes.

Abstract:

The ability to handle a hearing aid may impact on satisfaction with and acceptance of hearing aids by individuals with hearing loss.  There is evidence of the correlation between hearing aid handling skills and effective hearing aid use.  Although many studies have focused on the individuals’ satisfaction with their hearing aids there is a lack of information regarding the relationship between satisfaction with hearing aids and hearing aid handling skills.  This is especially true for the South African context, where no studies have been conducted to explore this relationship.  The main aim of the study was thus to determine the relationship between the ability to manipulate hearing aids and self-perceived satisfaction with hearing aids in individuals fitted with hearing aids in a public health care hospital.

                A non-experimental, cross-sectional, correlational research design was employed for the purpose of this study.  The sample included 85 adults fitted with hearing aids in a public health care hospital.  There was an equal distribution of gender and the mean age of participants was 66.27 years.   Participants completed the Practical Hearing Aid Skills Test – Revised (PHAST-R) version and the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL) questionnaire.

                The findings of the study indicate that the majority of participants were able to successfully manipulate their hearing aids (Mean score: 75.43%; Range: 10.71 - 100; SD: 21.58).   The mean global score for satisfaction with amplification was 5.2 (Range: 3.1 - 6.8; SD: 0.84) indicating high levels of satisfaction with their hearing aids.  Overall there was a significant correlation between hearing aid handling skills and satisfaction with amplification (rs= 0.22871; n = 85).

                The findings suggest that the majority of participants were satisfied with the hearing aids provided in a public health care hospital and that they were able to successfully handle their hearing aids.  The use of the PHAST-R as part of the hearing aid orientation session is encouraged especially in light of the poor return rate for follow-up hearing aid orientation sessions at this public health care settings.  The development of standard operating procedures for hearing aid fitting and orientation in the public health care sector is recommended to ensure that the best possible outcomes are ensured for all patients.

  • Implantable Technologies and Advancement in Treatment

Session Introduction

Y Krishna

Manipal University,Manipal,INDIA

Title: 4 “W” of technology – our perspective
Speaker
Biography:

Krishna Y has completed his PhD at the age of 40 years from Manipal University. He is graduate of All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, Mysore, India. He is currently professor and head  of Departmetn of Speech and Hearing, Manipal Unviersity, Manipal. He has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute journals nationally.

Abstract:

Technological advancements are growing at a very fast pace across the industry in the hearing aid. Many sound processing methods, sound enhancement technicques are coming and incorporated in the hearing aids to faciliate and make hering as comfortable experience. With advancements of chip technology, all these features have become even more possible. This session talks about When, What, Why and Who woudl be beneficiearies of the technological advancements. The Author with his experience in the clinic and research would present the evidence based parctice on how compression technologies and sound enhancement technologies facilitate better hearing with special reference to Indian scenario. Judicial selection of what technology would benefit whom and When and why a particular method is prefered over others is skill of the professional in fine tunning hearing aid. This is particularly very important when the listener is exposed to complex sound environmnets. In India, individuals with hearing impairment are exposed to unique sound environments, and its challenging to fit right amplification device within the budget of the client. The author will also share the results of the psychophicial experiments conducted in facilitating the decission, The objective of this presentation will be to make the professional faciliate in the decission making process during fitting of amplification devices. The learning outcomes of the lectures are targetted towards the awarness of technologies, understand the different environments and select appropriate technology to meet the lisiting demands of the individual. 

  • Hearing Impairment and Deafness- Causes and Treatment

Session Introduction

Hassan Haidar

Lebanese University, Lebanon

Title: Innovation in Otology: Stability of Ossicular Reconstruction
Speaker
Biography:

Hassan Haidar Ahmad graduated from the Faculty of Medical Sciences, Lebanese University, Lebanon in 2007 and obtained his Diploma of Specialization in Otolaryngology from the university in 2012. He also holds a Diploma of Advanced Specialization in Otolaryngology from the Faculty of Medical Sciences, Marseille, France and has undertaken a Fellowship in Otology-Neurotology at Hôpital Nord, Marseille. France. He is ENT cosultant in Hamad Medical Corporation inQatar. He is assistant Professor of clinical otolaryngology in Weill Cornell Medicine. He has published 2 full books and more than 25 papers in reputed journals. He has several presentations in many international conferences.

Abstract:

Objectives:  To describe a modified technique of titanium prosthesis stabilization in ossicular chain reconstruction during mastoidectomy, and to evaluate the outcome of this technique.

Methods: A retrospective study done at a tertiary referral institute Included 133 cases of all ossiculoplasties performed between August 2013 and August 2015. We are suggesting a new technique for ossiculoplasties mechanical stability using Vario Kurz titanium prostheses by: partial ossicular replacement prosthesis (PORP) is crimped on the head of stapes and total ossicular replacement prosthesis (TORP) is coupled to the footplate by cartilage shoe. Both prostheses were coupled to the drum by embedding a pin on the headpl ate of prosthesis in a full thickness broad cartilage palisades graft. After packing of the ear canal, the stability of reconstruction was checked using 30 degree scope placed in the mastoid. Preoperative and postoperative audiometric evaluation using air-bone gap were assessed. Results are compared with historical control groups.

Results: The study included 133 patients, of which 88 underwent PORP reconstruction and 45 underwent TORP reconstruction. Mean follow-up was 14 months. A postoperative air-bone gap (ABG)≤20 dB was obtained in 83 % of the patients ( 89% for PORP, and 71% for TORP).

Conclusions: A robust prosthesis stability leads to a better ossicular coupling and more satisfactory hearing outcome compared to conventional techniques